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National Bestseller

In his final years, Baldwin envisioned a book about his three assassinated friends, Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King. His deeply personal notes for the project had never been published before acclaimed filmmaker Raoul Peck mined Baldwin’s oeuvre to compose his stunning documentary film 
I Am Not Your Negro.

Peck weaves these texts together, brilliantly imagining the book that Baldwin never wrote with selected published and unpublished passages, essays, letters, notes, and interviews that are every bit as incisive and pertinent now as they have ever been. Peck’s film uses them to jump through time, juxtaposing Baldwin’s private words with his public statements, in a blazing examination of the tragic history of race in America.
 
This edition contains more than 40 black-and-white images from the film.

Nominated for the Academy Award for Best Documentary

Review

I Am Not Your Negro is a kaleidoscopic journey through the life and mind of James Baldwin, whose voice speaks even more powerfully today than it did 50 years ago. . . . He was the prose-poet of our injustice and inhumanity. . . . The times have caught up with his scalding eloquence.” — Variety
 
“A searing and topical indictment of racial prejudice and hatred in America that makes for uneasy viewing and is not easily forgotten. . . . Vividly intelligent.” — Hollywood Reporter
 
“A striking work of storytelling. . . . One of the best movies about the civil rights era ever made. . . . This might be the only movie about race relations that adequately explains—with sympathy—the root causes.” — The Guardian
 
“Thrilling. . . . A portrait of one man’s confrontation with a country that, murder by murder, as he once put it, ‘devastated my universe.’… One of the best movies you are likely to see this year.” — The New York Times

About the Author

JAMES BALDWIN (1924–1987) was a novelist, essayist, playwright, poet, social critic, and the author of more than twenty books. His first novel, Go Tell It on the Mountain, appeared in 1953 to excellent reviews, and his essay collections Notes of a Native Son and The Fire Next Time were bestsellers that made him an influential figure in the civil rights movement. Baldwin spent many years in France, where he moved to escape the racism and homophobia of the United States. He died in 1987.
 
RAOUL PECK is a filmmaker acclaimed for his historical, political, and artistic work. Haitian-born, he grew up in Congo, France, Germany, and the United States. His body of work includes the films The Man by the Shore (Competition, Cannes 1993); Lumumba (Cannes 2000, HBO); and Sometimes in April (2005, HBO). He is currently chairman of the French national film school, La Fémis, and recently completed his next feature film, The Young Karl Marx (2017).

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

As concerns Malcolm and Martin,
I watched two men, coming from unimaginably different backgrounds,
whose positions, originally, were poles apart,
driven closer and closer together.

By the time each died, their positions had become virtually the same position.
It can be said, indeed, that Martin picked up Malcolm’s burden,
articulated the vision which Malcolm had begun to see,
and for which he paid with his life.
And that Malcolm was one of the people Martin saw on the mountaintop.

Medgar was too young to have seen this happen,though he hoped for it, and would not have been surprised;
but Medgar was murdered first.

I was older than Medgar, Malcolm, and Martin.
I was raised to believe that the eldest was supposed to be a model for the younger,
and was, of course, expected to die first.

Not one of these three lived to be forty.

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4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

E.S. Ruete
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Why do we need him to be?
Reviewed in the United States on January 22, 2018
James Baldwin wrote my review: "What white people have to do is try and find out in their own ​hearts why it was necessary to have a “n___r” in the first place, because I’m not a n____r, I’m a man. But if you think I’m a n____r, it means you need him. The question... See more
James Baldwin wrote my review:
"What white people have to do is try and find out in their own ​hearts why it was necessary to have a “n___r” in the first place, because I’m not a n____r, I’m a man. But if you think I’m a n____r, it means you need him. The question that you’ve got to ask yourself, the white population of this country has got to ask itself, North and South because it’s one country and for a Negro there is no difference between the North and the South—it’s just a difference in the way they castrate you, but the fact of the castration is the American fact….If I’m not the n____r here and you invented him, you the white people invented him, then you’ve got to find out why. And the future of the country depends on that, whether or not it is able to ask that question.”

We need to read this book and work on that question, not as a rhetorical question or an imponderable Zen koan but seriously and concretely. The answer might even tell us why so many of us need Donald Trump, either as our hero or our devil.
81 people found this helpful
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BHodges
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A nice companion piece to the film
Reviewed in the United States on February 14, 2017
Impressionistic. Powerful. This book (and the film on which it is based) seem less intended to educate white people than to emote the perspective of one of the most perceptive and articulate 20th century voices of color. This book is not a primer for people... See more
Impressionistic. Powerful. This book (and the film on which it is based) seem less intended to educate white people than to emote the perspective of one of the most perceptive and articulate 20th century voices of color.

This book is not a primer for people unfamiliar with Baldwin. It''s a tribute to a project that Baldwin himself didn''t live to see completed. I think it works best as a companion piece to the film rather than a stand-alone book. (For instance, it includes excerpts from transcripts of movies that influenced Baldwin or that Baldwin reviewed, and these work better in their original medium.) I recommend seeing the film first, and then using the book for meditating and revisiting afterward.

I''d still like to see the full manuscript of Baldwin''s "Remember This House," in addition to the spliced up version used in this book. I would''ve liked if the book made it more clear where these particular excerpts are. It will be most successful if it points more and more readers to Baldwin''s works.
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StevieGJD
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book
Reviewed in the United States on February 11, 2017
What an amazing book. It is kind of the script to the movie, which I loved. Baldwin was an astonishingly intelligent and thoughtful voice in a very troubled period. We need more voices like his now.
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Timothy B. Tyson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Surgical Genius of "I Am Not Your "Negro"
Reviewed in the United States on April 20, 2017
Raoul Peck''s documentary film, "I Am Not Your Negro," is a brilliant, absorbing and stirring vision of James Baldwin as public civil rights advocate, crucial spokesperson for African Americans in a revolutionary time, a profound and eloquent voice that speaks as... See more
Raoul Peck''s documentary film, "I Am Not Your Negro," is a brilliant, absorbing and stirring vision of James Baldwin as public civil rights advocate, crucial spokesperson for African Americans in a revolutionary time, a profound and eloquent voice that speaks as clearly to this historical moment as it did to the one that it originally addressed. This is a truly outstanding film, timeless in its relevance and also in its art, that I intend to share with my students for as many years to come as I am blessed to enjoy. In this particular historical moment, "I Am Not Your Negro" is absolutely necessary, irreplaceable, inimitable. With my friend, Craig Werner, the brilliant literary scholar, music critic, and cultural historian, I watched this film twice in two days and ruminated over it for much longer than it took to watch it. The importance of this book by the same title is that it allows us to examine the film and explore Baldwin''s political voice more closely, checking to make sure we caught what was said, dwelling upon crucial moments and passages whose depth and complexity reward a more deliberate look. The film, however, is what really matters.

My conversations with Werner, chair of the Afro-American Studies Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where I taught for a decade, were illuminated by Ed Pavlic''s 2015 book, Who Can Afford to Improvise? James Baldwin and Black Music, the Lyric and the Listeners and other essays by this gifted poet and literary scholar. It is hard to separate Pavlic''s thought from the sparks that flew in our conversations, but it is impossible to understand them without him, either. In order to fully appreciate the film''s accomplishments, serious viewers need to remember that this public and overtly political James Baldwin that Peck holds up in the film is not the only Baldwin that lived. Pavlic makes this point by differentiating between "the public James Baldwin," whom we meet here in all his power, and "the personal Jimmy Baldwin," friend, lover, raconteur among the people of the night, and "Jamie," the son and the brother, who used this name when he signed the dozens and dozens of letters that he wrote to his beloved brother David. Peck paints the public and political Baldwin, the Baldwin of his incredible speeches, so well selected and framed in "I Am Not Your Negro," who is essentially the same voice in much of his nonfiction essays, but there are other Baldwins to explore, the James Baldwin of his novels, the Jimmy Baldwin of his personal life, and the Jamie of his familial devotion. According to Pavlic, there is also a fourth Baldwin, and I think Peck captures this one quite well, too, which is "an unnamed writer to translated himself into a kind of universal human kin."

"I Am Not Your Negro," both the film and this helpful book, preserves and brings to a needy and broken world the eloquence of one of its profound geniuses, whose genius, in T.S. Eliot''s definition of genius, comes from our history''s most powerful expressive culture and theological vision, a poetic genius that is ever sharper the closer it stands to the heart of that tradition, a moral visionary that "left the church to preach the gospel," as Baldwin said, a universal voice grounded in love, even when it is acerbic, slashing and surgically critical, when it is redemptive gospel, when it is unflinching blues, and when it is ingenious jazz. We all owe Raoul Peck an enormous debt of gratitude, and I feel that very deeply.
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zzoorroo
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Seller needs to respect the author more
Reviewed in the United States on June 16, 2020
This is NOT a review about the book. I admire and respect James Baldwin so much, which makes this item even more infuriating - do NOT purchase from this seller! The book feels like someone just print it out with a home printer, and trimmed the edges carelessly with a... See more
This is NOT a review about the book. I admire and respect James Baldwin so much, which makes this item even more infuriating - do NOT purchase from this seller! The book feels like someone just print it out with a home printer, and trimmed the edges carelessly with a scissor. It’s all ragged! And the formatting inside seems like someone downloaded an internet copy without properly formatting it into a book.
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Cara Lucia
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Penetrating words for our times past, present, future
Reviewed in the United States on April 2, 2017
Wow- this collection and view of James Baldwin is a penetrating and powerful economy of words that does Baldwin''s work justice. Of course I saw the film first and the author and filmmaker has done us and the Legacy of Baldwin a great service. Every word, view and concept... See more
Wow- this collection and view of James Baldwin is a penetrating and powerful economy of words that does Baldwin''s work justice. Of course I saw the film first and the author and filmmaker has done us and the Legacy of Baldwin a great service. Every word, view and concept that Baldwin ever uttered has become more true and more relevant with every passing year. We are in major trouble here in the US for all the reasons he predicted. What is so profound about Baldwin is what he understood so clearly about the pathos driving white western culture. Unless dismantled, this pathos makes it necessary to have an "other", a human being or group to blame and exploit. Fear and hate sustains this illness and continues to place us at risk for a sad decline all over the USA and Europe. My deepest hope is that we can continue to evolve toward peace and equality without the same degree of hatred, death and destruction that occurred through much of the 20th century. There''s no way this evolution will be pretty but I hope we can make it possible to leave less destruction in its path than our ancestors did. In this regard, this book is a scary and sad, but affirming opportunity to help us wake up and have the courage it will take to dismantle white privilege. It continues to kill all of us and right now one of the most afflicted victims of this illness sits in the white house, which for the time being is most certainly not the people''s house.
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Horace Mungin
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Baldwin saw himself as a witness, but the FBI saw him as a prime player in the struggle for black liberation.
Reviewed in the United States on April 2, 2017
Paying Dues James Baldwin died in December, 1984; since that time his pen has been silent, but in documentarian Raoul Paul’s 2016 academy award nominated documentary film I’m Not Your Negro Baldwin speaks to us from the beyond. Here, not only does Baldwin explain... See more
Paying Dues

James Baldwin died in December, 1984; since that time his pen has been silent, but in documentarian Raoul Paul’s 2016 academy award nominated documentary film I’m Not Your Negro Baldwin speaks to us from the beyond. Here, not only does Baldwin explain the intricacies of the racial dynamics of his time, but Paul by putting together a synthesis of Baldwin filmed speeches, television appearances, notes, book excerpts, comments by Baldwin friend’s and given complete access to the Baldwin Estate by executor Gloria Baldwin Karefa-Smart, he allows Baldwin to instructs us on current racial circumstances as well. Then there is so much Baldwinnese that is ageless that they apply to then and now.

Raoul Paul had all of this to weave together, when Gloria, oldest of Baldwin’s two younger sisters give him a thirty page uncompleted manuscript Baldwin started before he flew away. The manuscript’s working title was of “Notes Toward Remember This House,” a book about Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. Baldwin meet and worked with all three of these murdered African American leaders once he returned to America from France to “Pay my dues.”

Baldwin, who moved to France early in his writing career to avoid American racism and to experience life as a man unhindered by pettiness of American racism, monitored dispatches of the situation back home. Because he missed none of the American amenities he had no desire to return to it. He only missed his family and the Harlem Sunday mornings, fried chicken and biscuits, the music and “that style possessed by no other people in the world.” After seeing in a Paris newpapper the anguish on the face of a young black school girl being reviled and spat on by an angry white mob as she made it to her newly integrated Charlotte, North Carolina school, he became furious and filled with hatred and pity and shame. “Someone of us should have been with her,” he later writes. It was then that he knew that he was leaving France for home and the battle. He surmised that everyone else was paying their dues; it was time he came home and paid his.

So Baldwin returned to the United States of America and immediately involved himself in the struggle to liberate black souls. James Baldwin was aware from childhood that no one resembling his father has ever appeared in American cinema and that it was from American cinema that America, and therefore the people of America, got a sense of itself. Movies were a reflection of the lives we all live. As Baldwin did in his literature, I’m Not Your Negro lays out the case against racism and bigotry in a methodical manner that gives one the sense of the futility of the whole enterprise in the long run. Whites have gain much from their devised system of discrimination in the interim, but it has been pointed out in ways spread widely enough for all of to know that none of us is free until we are all totally free.

Baldwin describe his involvement in the Civil Rights struggle as a “Witness” and uses an episode with Medgar Evers, then Chairmen of the Mississippi Chapter of the NAACP, to explain what he meant by witness. Evers was once asked to investigate the murder of a black man that happened several months earlier. He showed the letter to Baldwin and asked him to accompany him on the investigative field trip. This is when Baldwin discovered the line that separates a witness from a principal player on the stage of events. Baldwin knew that he was not responsible for any of decisions that governed the success or failure of the Movement, his responsibility, as a witness, was to get around as freely as possible, to write the story, and get it out there.

In doing what he saw as his dues paying duty, Baldwin managed to grab the attention of the FBI who monitored him closely enough to develop a file that concluded that Baldwin was a dangerous individual who could be expected to commit acts inimical to the national defense and public safety to the United states in times of emergency and James Baldwin’s name was included in the security index.

Baldwin saw himself as a witness, but the FBI saw him as a prime player in the struggle for black liberation.

James Baldwin fought alongside Martin Luther King, Jr. and other black leaders to end segregation in public places and he lived to see that come about. I’m Not Your Negro affords us an opportunity to weight Baldwin’s judgement on America’s race problem on current situations. Not what Baldwin would say about Ferguson or Baltimore, rather, what has Baldwin said about these events even before they happened? Baldwin declaration that their not knowing what’s happening to the Negro is not only the result of their apathy, but is also because they simply don’t want to know and that this makes them moral monsters.

You’ll find other incidents where Baldwin’s words prove appropriate to applied to today’s facts in the documentary and students of the Black Lives Matter Movement will have a field day deciphering and pairing Baldwin’s words to today’s on the ground racial facts. Through I’m Not Your Negro, James Baldwin lives.
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gmw5555
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I now know Mr. Baldwin!
Reviewed in the United States on September 4, 2017
This is an example of an African American Man using his unrivaled intelligence to Fight for all people of African Decent''s right to not only exist in the USA, but to thrive as equals to any other race of people! I was moved to purchase and read this book because the film... See more
This is an example of an African American Man using his unrivaled intelligence to Fight for all people of African Decent''s right to not only exist in the USA, but to thrive as equals to any other race of people! I was moved to purchase and read this book because the film was only shown on one screen for two weeks, at 8 pm and 11 pm only in the Most Culturally Diverse City in The United States of America. I downloaded the book on my kindle and read it in two evenings. Uncommon Bravery is displayed by Mr. James Baldwin in spite of the risk to his life. Through this extremely well done book his memory will live on in the hearts and minds of modern freedom fighters throughout the World! The "Black Lives Matter," movement is a cry for help in my opinion and not dissimilar to Mr. Balwin''s poignant message from the grave!
9 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Michelle
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
2 stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 10, 2019
This book is basically the notes, essays, letters etc etc that James Baldwin had planned to pull together for his book ''Remember this House'' which remained unfinished at the time of his death. These notes where then pulled together by Raoul Peck and resulted in the I Am Not...See more
This book is basically the notes, essays, letters etc etc that James Baldwin had planned to pull together for his book ''Remember this House'' which remained unfinished at the time of his death. These notes where then pulled together by Raoul Peck and resulted in the I Am Not Your Negro documentary. It''s a very quick read, for me I would prefer to watch the documentary, and I will do, however it did slightly build upon the Martin Luther King / Malcom X book that I read last year so it was worthwhile.
3 people found this helpful
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chigal
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very much needed at this time
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 2, 2020
With all going on in the USA right now (re- police profiling and killing of black people) and the resulting worldwide movement that have sprung and gained momentum, this book sheds some light that will help people have the necessary conversations around race. Evil continues...See more
With all going on in the USA right now (re- police profiling and killing of black people) and the resulting worldwide movement that have sprung and gained momentum, this book sheds some light that will help people have the necessary conversations around race. Evil continues because good people remain silent! Black, brown, white, red, whatever colour (shouldn’t really be saying this as we’re the human race and shouldn’t be defined by colour) , get yourselves some books on the subject.
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Jonathan Nicholas - Author
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A good introduction to this author
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 11, 2020
The author states he loved John Wayne films when he was young; until, that is, he realised he was the Indians. It’s a different perspective on life & America, from a black man’s point of view. It’s a short easy read & so a great introduction to this author, as recommended...See more
The author states he loved John Wayne films when he was young; until, that is, he realised he was the Indians. It’s a different perspective on life & America, from a black man’s point of view. It’s a short easy read & so a great introduction to this author, as recommended to me by someone on Twitter. Recommended.
One person found this helpful
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Rani Ban
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The format is notes.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 22, 2018
It was an interesting read, and highlights issues that sadly are still significant today. Some people still judge others by skin colour and not by the thoughts they think or how they feel.
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Picasso’s cat
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Powerful and relevant, but a very brief book.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 5, 2020
As a Baldwin fan, I was eager to read more about the history of Black Americans, and although this has some relevant and very timely messages, it is barely more than a slim compilation of notes, seemingly random in sequence - it took about an hour to read. As such, I’m sure...See more
As a Baldwin fan, I was eager to read more about the history of Black Americans, and although this has some relevant and very timely messages, it is barely more than a slim compilation of notes, seemingly random in sequence - it took about an hour to read. As such, I’m sure the film will prove a better bet for your money, as the intent of the project is good. Reading any one of Baldwin’s Books will give an insight into the historical violence, injustice and inhumanity that many black people in the US have been, and still are, forced to endure.
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